Initial Review of the Rocketbook Core Reusable Notebook

I just received the Rocketbook Core (formerly known as the Rocketbook Everlast), a notebook with reusable pages, erasable with water and a microfiber cloth.

With the help of the Rocketbook app, the notebook’s pages can be quickly scanned (photographed) and uploaded to Google Drive, along with a typed version of the document. The pages can be uploaded to other destinations as well, but I’ve only tested two of these, Google Drive and OneDrive. With OneDrive, no transcription could be sent.

Below is the original document written in Rocketbook. The special pen moved easily across the flexible plastic page and writing required minimal hand pressure. I found it easier to write on the Rocketbook pages than with pen and paper. Although I’d read complaints that the special ink dries slowly, it seemed to dry as quickly as that of any gel pen.

There are dots across the Rocketbook pages, and symbols at the bottom of each page. The symbols are assigned to various destinations via the Rocketbook app. Draw an X through one of the symbols, and the app sends the scanned document to its chosen destination.

The dots on the page may help the application, but they are too faint to be used as writing guides. Both the dots and destination symbols are barely detectable to the human eye.


Original document written in a Rocketbook.

In the photo above, note the slug at the top of the page (## Rocketbook Trial 2021 08 27 ##). This assigned a file name to the document.

Below is the transcription created by the Rocketbook app.



I copied the transcribed text into Microsoft Word. Rocketbook read each line as a separate sentence, so I had to manually go in and delete the line breaks.

The app also didn’t like the way I write the letter “I”, so I may modify my handwriting to accommodate that preference.

It identified bulleted lists, but performed better during a previous trial. In that trial, the items following bullets were of shorter length. They were not long sentences as in this document. I found that it was also helpful to add a period after each bulleted item. Otherwise, Rocketbook did creative things with the empty space.

Below is the Word-corrected document. I’ve noted the changes in red. It took 3 minutes and 20 seconds to reformat and correct the transcription.



Although the transcription wasn’t perfect, Rocketbook is still a useful tool that I’ll be using in the future–likely daily.

It is also affordable for the average person. I ordered mine from the Rocketbook web site, and received the notebook, a microfiber cloth, and 3 back-up pens for under $35.00

(This review was unsolicited and unsponsored.)

ADDENDUM: I created a macro in Microsoft Word that will format transcriptions with the click of a button. The macro finds all of the double paragraph-marks that Rocketbook places at the end of each line. It replaces the double paragraph-marks with a single space. The macro also looks for the number 2 with a space on each side (since I often write 2 instead of “to” when I’m in a hurry). Additionally, it replaces pp (two p’s with space on either side) with double-paragraph symbols. This allows me to divide paragraphs while writing by hand. I simply place two p’s (with a space on either side) between the period of one paragraph and the first letter of the following paragraph (For example: And that concludes that story. pp Now on to something else…). Now my Rocketbook transcription takes only moments to format.

Published by cafsamsel

Carol Fullerton-Samsel is a nearly-native Floridian who lives with her husband of 25 years and three rescue animals. She is a [mostly] vegan, alcohol-free, [relatively] caffeine-free, Buddhist writer and day-hiker. Her novel, The Clones of Langston, was a Reader’s Favorite medalist and a New Century Writer Awards finalist. It tells the story of cloned workers who are abandoned to form their own society. As the facility housing them erodes, they discover a challenging new world—our own.

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